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Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered

Stock Photography By John L Coombes

For over a century Tasmanian Devils were trapped and poisoned and became very rare. Like the Tasmanian tiger, they seemed to be headed for extinction. It was not June 1941 that the Tasmanian devil was protected by law, and the population began to increase. Unfortunately The Devil Facial Tumour Disease is now having a devastating effect on the Tasmanian devil population.In May 2008, The Tasmanian Devil’s status was upgraded to ‘endangered’.

Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609836
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609839
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609841
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609835
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609840
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609845
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609844
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609834
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609843
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609838
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609837
© John L Coombes
Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus
#609842
© John L Coombes

 

Photo Captions for Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered

Image #1. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #2. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #3. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #4. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #5. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #6. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #7. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #8. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #9. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #10. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #11. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

Image #12. Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) Endangered The Tasmanian devil cannot be mistaken for any other marsupial. Its spine-chilling screeches, black colour, and reputed bad-temper, led the early European settlers to call it The Devil. Although only the size of a small dog, it can sound and look incredibly fierce.

 

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